A Nobel for Non-Fiction?

http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/nonfiction-deserves-nobel?utm_source=tny&utm_campaign=generalsocial&utm_medium=facebook&mbid=social_facebook

This Weekend: The Seattle Book Fair

http://www.seattlebookfair.com/2014/sabf.floorplan.2014.htm

Reading is Good For You, Books are Best

http://mic.com/articles/99408/science-has-great-news-for-people-who-read-actual-books

Books to Watch for in October

From the New Yorker:

http://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/books-watch-october-2014?utm_source=tny&utm_campaign=generalsocial&utm_medium=facebook&mbid=social_facebook

Hearts, a poem by Yahia Lababidi

Yahia was in town in July  2012 for the third San Francisco International Poetry Festival.
Hearts

We must not play with hearts
for who can calculate
what they are capable of, or
what becomes of them

How they slip, change shape
practice forgetfulness and purge,
surrendering pleasure with pain
as unsteady burdens of memory

Or how they grow wayward, wild
the wounded become wounding
and, in order to keep alive,
treacherous in the trenches

Until they are unrecognizable
to their owners, brokers or breakers
and what began as deception
proves to be a self-delusion

Counterfactual Conditionals, a poem by Peter Sherburn-Zimmer

Counterfactual Conditionals

 

“You see no experiment can be repeated exactly. There will always be something different…” – Sir Geo. Thomson

 

[1]        flecks of dust in this void

this empty ring so hard to be space

take the place of that live conversation

around the empty table

watch one more image

seek rest…

 

flocks of dust in the air

settle down, mama,

someone else’s song,

not mine.

 

its always someone else’s song

unless you sing yours

to them

 

[2]        what if:

someday…tomorrow

I had so much,

 

my cash balance would be:

so much per day through next

Wednesday, the 1st of October.

 

that would leave me paid up through whatever

 

[3]        It is my view

that I should know

more about Duncan

than I can –

if I go on

as I have.

 

I perplexes me

that the walls are too high

to climb alone…

just because I am alone.

 

If the New College

had been born ten years later

 

[4]        or the messenger service

I worked for in the sixties

had more messages

than a paltry quarter million

for me to deliver across town

 

[coda]

or if

or if

but it is what it is:

 

I shall never learn French

when I should have learned Spanish

 

& and the hills are so far away.

 

 

 

Alt Lit is Dead

Interesting…adult content….

http://quaintmagazine.com/alt-lit-is-dead-burn-the-corpses-salt-the-bodies/

The Moon is a Mistake, a new poem by Neeli Cherkovski

The Moon is a Mistake
The moon is a mistake
We live with
All the days of our lives

Yet we enjoy it and
Wait in expectation
For its light

In so many ways
We’re drawn
To its misery

Maybe it will crumble
One night
And leave a gaping hole

Until then we are
Entertained by the tragic
Misunderstandings

That lead to war. The moon
Is a war god that tears
Us apart, etches on our

Composure and pulls
The tides beyond
What is reasonable.

Toss bread and wine
Onto a flood of moonlight
And immortalize human

Misery — be brief and allow
The power of words
To conquer lunar ire

I will remember
The bumpy roads
Through the moon’s

Terrain. — the dust of
Unlimited desire
To live forever

And be a beam
In this cosmological
Graveyard forever

Thursdays at Readers Poetry Series: Stephen Kessler and Michael C. Ford

Join us every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. in our Readers Bookstore Fort Mason for our weekly FREE poetry series! Browse books and enjoy a glass of wine while listening to internationally acclaimed poets and artists such as Jonathan Richman, David Meltzer, Diane di Prima and California Poet Laureate Al Young. The series is  curated by Friends’ Resident Poet Jack Hirschman. For a full line-up and more information please visit our website at www.friendssfpl.org.

Proceeds from our bookstores benefit the San Francisco Public Library

On October 2nd  we are excited to have  Stephen Kessler and Michael C. Ford read!

sk_scoppet5Stephen Kessler is the author of nine books of poetry, most recently Scratch Pegasus (Swan Scythe Press); fifteen books of literary translation, most recently Poems of Consummation by Vicente Aleixandre (Black Widow Press), a finalist for the 2014 Northern California Book Award; three books of prose, most recently The Tolstoy of the Zulus: On Culture, Arts and Letters (essays, El León Literary Arts); and the editor and principal translator of The Sonnets by Jorge Luis Borges (Penguin Classics).  Since 1999 he has been the editor of The Redwood Coast Review, a quarterly literary newspaper, four-time winner of the California Library Association’s PR Excellence Award.  He has three new books due out in 2015: Where Was I? (memoirs, prose poems); Need I Say More? Portraits, Confessions, Reflections (essays); and Reality and Desire, new selected poems of Luis Cernuda (translation).  He lives in Santa Cruz.

 

 

Near Broadway and Columbus

In search of the perfect notebook I am cruising Chinatown.  The discount gift and kitsch store shelves are brimming with useless crap of every kind to seduce the tourists shopping for souvenirs amid the smells of herbs and ginseng, fish and dim sum, greens and green tea up and down the street where on a weekday afternoon in splendid weather camera-carrying families swarm in several languages.  Upstairs in City Lights the silent poets wait it out in the afterlife, their volumes patiently through thin and thinner poised like shelter cats to be selected by customers desperate for company.  Outside, the avenue slopes downhill and uphill as on any other Heraclitean day, fires cooking in a thousand kitchens, pizzas baking, garlic simmering, espressos being brewed in cafés where ladies eat ice cream and gossip happily in their widowhood.  Bums and yuppies savor the sun of Washington Square Park and the spires of St. Peter and Paul’s seem to gleam with all but divine light.  At Capp’s and O’Reilly’s baseball games are being played on TVs above the bar, and yet how close around these corners ghosts of drunken beatniks haunt the alleys with their mournful tales of spiraling decline.  Ferlinghetti would have none of it, refusing to stagger into that dark vortex, climbing instead the stairs of his business up to his office on the second floor to gaze out over the neighborhood with the stamina of a survivor and all the crafty gratitude of one who invented luck.  And how did such good fortune befall me even to live this long and to witness the endless spectacle of these streets, these shops, these eateries, some of which I know well enough to walk in as if I belong there and make my way directly to the men’s room.  Where are the strippers of yesteryear?  Replaced by nimbler babes and newer barkers touting their charms to passing pedestrians.  Even without caffeine I am wide awake, trying to find my place in the proceedings, Year-of-the-Dragon pen speaking in tongues of black ink on compact pages bound in boards of nearly Chinese red.

Stephen Kessler

MichaelCFord-Jill-Jarrett-picMichael C. Ford
Five of his volumes are out of the ION DRIVE PUBLISHING catalogue: To Kiss The BloodOff Our Hands, The Marilyn MonroeConcerto, The Demented Chauffeur,  Las Vegas Quartet and San Joaquin County Solutions: this last title being a collaborative effort with text by the author and Sacramento Delta prize-winning photojournalist Rose Albano Risso.Atonal Riffs to a Tone-Deaf Borderguardwas published in 2012.  His 2013 entry isa compilation of street poetry entitledCrosswalk Casserole, also, published by LAWN GNOME BOOKS in Phoenix. AZ.Forthcoming from Word Palace Press:Women Under the Influence.Forthcoming from Ranchos Press: TheDriftwood Crucifix.Forthcoming from Punk HostagePress:Loitering in the Lobby of the Lonely HeartsClub. His most recent volume of work is a spoken word recording entitled Look Each Other in the Ears. He is accompanied by some heraldic musicians on the West Coast not the least of which are surviving members of a notorious California 4tet most of you will remember as THE DOORS.(in both CD & LP formats

ANOTHER PSALM FROMA RENTED ROOM

 After David Meltzer

 

My American prairie outlaw hideout has an

absence of absinthe and salt water. It is not

 

a fortress. It is not a  burning Albuquerque

abbreviation. Rather it has a centerpiece: a

 

bent rose drunk with open windows, where

I scoff plain suppers and listen to music with

 

colorful chord changes. I hear angels of

complex harmonics grooving in my soft

 

gourd. I write small town epistles to strangers

and learn desert words to use when my mouth

 

is dry, but working. Having been able to do

this crazy and alone: a tablet full of epitaphs.

 

 Michael C Ford

 Placitas, New Mexico ( 2014)

 

 

 

Thursdays at Readers Poetry Series: Lorene Zarou-Zouzounis and James Cagney

Join us every Thursday at 6:30 p.m. in our Readers Bookstore Fort Mason for our weekly FREE poetry series! Browse books and enjoy a glass of wine while listening to internationally acclaimed poets and artists such as Jonathan Richman, David Meltzer, Diane di Prima and California Poet Laureate Al Young. The series is  curated by Friends’ Resident Poet Jack Hirschman. For a full line-up and more information please visit our website at www.friendssfpl.org.

Proceeds from our bookstores benefit the San Francisco Public Library

On October 9th  we are excited to have  Lorene Zarou-Zouzounis and James Cagney read!

LoreneLorene Zarou-Zouzounis is a writer and a poet. she received an Associate of Arts degree from City College of San Francisco, before beginning her university studies at the renowned Creative Writing Department at San Francisco State University. Her first poem was published in a CCSF anthology followed by three poems published in a SFSU anthology, published by the Humanities & Women Studies Departments. In 1987 she self-published a 50 page poetry chap book entitled Inquire Within, and is currently completing a poetry anthology entitled Faces:The Nine Stations of Pain and Joy. Zarou-Zouzounis co-authored an historical fiction children’s book as part of a series about the ancient world for young readers.The first story, Asham and the Smart Ox is set in ancient Jericho after the last Ice Age. Another work in progress is a memoir–a collection of stories about her mother’s life in Ramallah. 

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